Normalism and Legal Representation in Canadian Art

It appears your Web browser is not configured to display PDF files. Download adobe Acrobat or click here to download the PDF file.

Click here to download the PDF file.

Creator: 

Curley, Evan Daniel

Date: 

2021

Abstract: 

In this thesis, I consider a 2014 Supreme Court hearing involving the National Gallery of Canada and CARFAC-RAAV, our nation's preeminent artists' advocacy group. It is my proposition that CARFAC-RAAV's success in the hearing, which legally required the National Gallery to pay mandatory minimum fees to exhibiting artists, is part of a process of reification of an artistic productivism. Theoretical considerations build toward this conclusion focusing on the study of the antithetical tendencies of the legal and artistic orders. I argue that the former is based on a predilection for continuity and permanence, the latter on reflexivity and a certain anomalistic acceptance of things anew. When these two orders meet in the event of the hearing, a juridical rigidity of value and vision finds mooring in the artistic field. In this case, law becomes one important sinew of normalism in the Canadian artistic field.

Subject: 

Sociology

Language: 

English

Publisher: 

Carleton University

Thesis Degree Name: 

Master of Arts: 
M.A.

Thesis Degree Level: 

Master's

Thesis Degree Discipline: 

Sociology

Parent Collection: 

Theses and Dissertations

Items in CURVE are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated. They are made available with permission from the author(s).