Interactive computer-aided design of single span and continuous prestressed concrete beams

Creator: 

Daniels, Dawn M. (Dawn Marie), 1963-

Date: 

1990

Abstract: 

A comprehensive program that runs on IBM and compatible microcomputers was developed to demonstrate modern programming techniques in engineering analysis and design. As a vehicle for this demonstration, a program was developed to perform the analysis and design of simply supported and continuous prestressed concrete beams. While there are programs which perform this task, the program described here presents the engineer with an intuitive and humanistic working enviroment and permits a high degree of control over program operations. The menu-driven nature of the program together with its graphics capabilities makes the program very interactive, easy to use, and stimulating.

The program can be used to design or analyze members for flexure, under service and ultimate conditions, as well as for shear and torsion. Prestress losses can be calculated using a time-step method and their effect on deformations and stress redistribution can be determined. All design aspects are governed by the current Canadian code of practice and applies to fully prestressed, noncracked pretensioned and post-tensioned members. Liberal use of graphics provides not only a visually stimulating environment but also serves as a powerful and effective means for conveying information. Design hints and code limits are also provided at various design stages to aid in the input of data and the analysis of results. The program can be used to design both building and bridge structures

Subject: 

Engineering Design -- Computer Programs
Prestressed Concrete Beams

Language: 

English

Publisher: 

Carleton University

Thesis Degree Name: 

Master of Engineering: 
M.Eng.

Thesis Degree Level: 

Master's

Thesis Degree Discipline: 

Engineering, Civil

Parent Collection: 

Theses and Dissertations

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