Verbs and Participants: Nonlinguists' Intuitions

It appears your Web browser is not configured to display PDF files. Download adobe Acrobat or click here to download the PDF file.

Click here to download the PDF file.

Creator: 

Barbu, Roxana-Maria

Date: 

2015

Abstract: 

Arguments and adjuncts play a crucial role in linguistic theories. Despite the vast body of research that assumes a distinction between arguments and adjuncts, not only in linguistics, but also in philosophy of language, psycholinguistics and neurolinguistics, there are no universally agreed-upon definitions distinguishing the two. The modest aim of this thesis is to investigate English speakers’ intuitions with respect to verbs and their arguments. To do so, the study makes use of the Core Participants Test, disguised in four different tasks, with each task eliciting, arguably, the same kind of intuitions. The results indicate that different tasks tap into either semantic or syntactic intuitions, or sometimes both. Overall, speakers' intuitions often matched linguists' views.

Subject: 

Psychology - Cognitive
Linguistics

Language: 

English

Publisher: 

Carleton University

Thesis Degree Name: 

Master of Cognitive Science: 
M.Cog.Sc

Thesis Degree Level: 

Master's

Thesis Degree Discipline: 

Cognitive Science

Parent Collection: 

Theses and Dissertations

Items in CURVE are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated. They are made available with permission from the author(s).