Made

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Creator: 

Choi, Nicholas

Date: 

2019

Abstract: 

A chasm instigated by technological advancements is alienating architects from the construction process. Concurrently, this detachment changes the architect's relation to material culture. The role of the maker is divided between those who design and those who fabricate, meanwhile being driven by an industry that demands inhuman speed and efficiency. In contrast, the values set forth by craft-centric ideologies oppose this model in favor of laborious care and skill. Consequently, this ideology becomes perceived as luxury, and often cast aside.

Navigating this landscape, I begin to question the role of making within architecture. Do ideas of craft maintain relevance in a technological era? Are our tools becoming so complex that they enslave those they were meant to empower? Through research into how craft and tools exist today, this thesis aims to redefine fundamental values in making-culture by engaging acts of critical observation and experiential making.

Subject: 

Architecture

Language: 

English

Publisher: 

Carleton University

Thesis Degree Name: 

Master of Architecture: 
M.Arch.

Thesis Degree Level: 

Master's

Thesis Degree Discipline: 

Architecture

Parent Collection: 

Theses and Dissertations

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