The Role of Oxytocin and Psychosocial Factors in Online Social Networking in Times of Emotional Distress

It appears your Web browser is not configured to display PDF files. Download adobe Acrobat or click here to download the PDF file.

Click here to download the PDF file.

Creator: 

Friberg, Laura

Date: 

2015

Abstract: 

The present study examined the use of social networking websites to give and receive social support. Participants were asked to create a hypothetical status update about a stressful time and rate their reactions to one of six messages that either contain information about calling a crisis line or indicate that no one responded. Messages with personal involvement increased positive affect, and any of the messages were received as more supportive than no message at all. In general, messages that were private were perceived as more supportive than public ones, even among individuals who felt
stigmatized or depressed. An offer of personal involvement was perceived positively for most, but could be less helpful to the highly depressed or if the messages were sent publicly to individuals experiencing low levels of stigma. Overall, there is promise in using online communication tools in the treatment and prevention of mental health issues.

Subject: 

Behavioral
Psychobiology
Genetics

Language: 

English

Publisher: 

Carleton University

Thesis Degree Name: 

Master of Science: 
M.Sc.

Thesis Degree Level: 

Master's

Thesis Degree Discipline: 

Neuroscience

Parent Collection: 

Theses and Dissertations

Items in CURVE are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated. They are made available with permission from the author(s).