The Production and Perception of Vowel Height and Duration

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Creator: 

Stone, Adam William

Date: 

2015

Abstract: 

High vowels are generally shorter than low vowels: there is a positive correlation between F1 and duration in English and cross-linguistically (Heffner 1937; Elert 1964; Äimä, 1918). This paper argues that the cross-linguistic height/duration correlation might be explained perceptually: high vowels inherently sound shorter than low vowels. Study 1 analyzed Chilean Spanish vowels to determine whether this correlation is physiological in nature or the result of linguistic rules, finding that the correlation is linguistically-specified. To account for the cross-linguistic occurrence of the correlation, Study 2 tested if speakers perceive shorter high vowels in a forced-choice perception task. Results indicate that high vowels indeed sound shorter, and that this vowel categorization ability is partially learned.

Subject: 

Linguistics
Psychology - Cognitive
Psychology - Experimental

Language: 

English

Publisher: 

Carleton University

Thesis Degree Name: 

Master of Cognitive Science: 
M.Cog.Sc

Thesis Degree Level: 

Master's

Thesis Degree Discipline: 

Cognitive Science

Parent Collection: 

Theses and Dissertations

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