Impact of Nicotine Withdrawal and Postcessation Self-Efficacy on Short-Term Abstinence from Smoking

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Creator: 

Armstrong, Ashley Catherine

Date: 

2014

Abstract: 

Nicotine withdrawal is cited by smokers as a principal reason for relapse and a significant barrier to sustained abstinence. Postcessation self-efficacy is established as a predictor of smoking cessation success but may be influenced by the impact of nicotine withdrawal symptoms. The objective of the current study was to determine if the relationship between nicotine withdrawal and relapse to smoking was mediated by diminished postcessation self-efficacy. Smokers (N = 266) ready to make a quit attempt completed measures of nicotine withdrawal, depressed mood and self-efficacy at Week 1
post-target quit date (TQD); smoking status was collected at Week 3 post-TQD. Both nicotine withdrawal (OR = 0.56, CI = 0.36-0.85, p <.01) and self-efficacy (OR = 1.50, CI = 1.09- 2.05, p <.05) predicted continuous abstinence at Week 3; depressed mood did not. Mediational analysis did not support the contention that self-efficacy mediated the role of nicotine withdrawal on abstinence.

Subject: 

Behavioral

Language: 

English

Publisher: 

Carleton University

Thesis Degree Name: 

Master of Arts: 
M.A.

Thesis Degree Level: 

Master's

Thesis Degree Discipline: 

Psychology

Parent Collection: 

Theses and Dissertations

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