Leaving Kuujjuarapik: An Ethnography of the Inuit Experience of Travelling Down South to Face Justice

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Creator: 

Shalaby, Carina M.

Date: 

2015

Abstract: 

Aboriginal people continue to be disproportionately overrepresented in Canadian correctional populations. Most of the literature regarding “what works” for Aboriginal inmates, places great emphasis on traditional culture as a primary method of rehabilitation. However little is known of how Aboriginal peoples actually perceive mainstream Western programming or culturally sensitive programming. Through the narratives of Inuit participants, this research attempts to determine how Inuit peoples experience Western forms of justice and how they negotiate the use and forms of traditional culture to create common ground with Elders and resist further perceived attempts of assimilation by the state.

Subject: 

Cultural Anthropology
Canadian Studies
Criminology and Penology

Language: 

English

Publisher: 

Carleton University

Thesis Degree Name: 

Master of Arts: 
M.A.

Thesis Degree Level: 

Master's

Thesis Degree Discipline: 

Anthropology

Parent Collection: 

Theses and Dissertations

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