How do trees make sweet edible sap in spring?

It appears your Web browser is not configured to display PDF files. Download adobe Acrobat or click here to download the PDF file.

Click here to download the PDF file.

Creator: 

Young, Ross Noble

Date: 

2018

Abstract: 

How do trees make sweet edible sap in spring? At the end of winter, sap of temperate broadleaf eudicot trees provides energy-rich sugars for animals and peoples of North America. Here, I conduct a multi-disciplinary synthesis to elucidate a theory of sap production and movement at a 'whole tree' level. I begin by contrasting settler knowledge to Indigenous knowledge of maples, and describe how "two-eyed seeing" may be used to address settler appropriation of maples and begin to decolonize maple provisions. Second, with a synthesis of scientific literature I show that sugars are not just byproducts of sap movement, but are signaling molecules that reveal a blurred functional distinction between xylem and phloem. I propose numerous predictions from my theory of sap movement. Finally, when testing whether spring xylem sap sugar concentration correlates with number of cells in the width of xylem rays I found significant positive correlation.

Subject: 

Botany
Plant Physiology

Language: 

English

Publisher: 

Carleton University

Contributor: 

Consent for figure reproduction: 
Richard Jagels
Consent for figure reproduction: 
Damian Cirelli
License for figure reproduction: 
Oxford University Press
License for figure reproduction: 
Oxford University Press

Thesis Degree Name: 

Master of Science: 
M.Sc.

Thesis Degree Level: 

Master's

Thesis Degree Discipline: 

Biology

Parent Collection: 

Theses and Dissertations

Items in CURVE are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated. They are made available with permission from the author(s).