Factors Influencing Run Strength of Upper Yukon River Chinook Salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha)

It appears your Web browser is not configured to display PDF files. Download adobe Acrobat or click here to download the PDF file.

Click here to download the PDF file.

Creator: 

Sebes, James Carleton Coll

Date: 

2020

Abstract: 

Pacific salmon (Oncorhynchus spp.) are anadromous fish distributed around the Pacific Ocean. Pacific salmon generate numerous ecosystem services related to the nutrition, livelihoods and culture of humans. Widespread declines in this vital resource over the past century and specifically the last few decades have prompted efforts to identify the drivers of and remedy Pacific salmon decline. I used quasi-Poisson Generalized Linear Models (GLMs) to quantify the influence of multiple environmental and anthropogenic factors on the run size of Yukon River Chinook Salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) that spawn upstream of Whitehorse, Yukon, Canada. The main predictor of population variation was sea surface temperature, discernable during both marine entry and exit. Whitehorse Chinook Salmon are a small, edge population and my findings suggest that they may experience exacerbated effects of future perturbations to North Pacific and global climate compared to other populations of the same species.

Subject: 

Ecology

Language: 

English

Publisher: 

Carleton University

Thesis Degree Name: 

Master of Science: 
M.Sc.

Thesis Degree Level: 

Master's

Thesis Degree Discipline: 

Biology

Parent Collection: 

Theses and Dissertations

Items in CURVE are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated. They are made available with permission from the author(s).