An evaluation of Carleton's Mediation Centre : mediator and outcome effects

Creator: 

Borshuk, Catherine

Date: 

1995

Abstract: 

The effects of being involved in a peer mediation program were examined in a pretest/posttest design. Nineteen peer mediators were measured on social self-esteem, communication apprehension, beliefs in altruism and just world, and styles of coping. Major results include higher social self-esteem for mediators, greater amounts of communication apprehension in meetings, and an increased tendency to believe the world is a just place for both groups, over time. Mediators also responded to a qualitative questionnaire; findings reveal many desire more on-going training in mediation skills, and more opportunities to mediate disputes. Items dealing with self-reported changes revealed mediators believe they have experienced positive changes in communication and listening skills. Mediators reported using conflict resolution skills at work and with their families. Finally, consumer satisfaction was measured for nine disputants who had conflicts mediated; 44% were satisfied with their mediation, 77% felt the mediators had treated them fairly, and 89% believed they had learned useful conflict resolution skills.

Subject: 

Mediation
Interpersonal Communication
College Students -- Psychology

Language: 

English

Publisher: 

Carleton University

Thesis Degree Name: 

Master of Arts: 
m

Thesis Degree Level: 

Master's

Thesis Degree Discipline: 

Psychology

Parent Collection: 

Theses and Dissertations

Items in CURVE are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated. They are made available with permission from the author(s).