The Administration of the Non-Insured Health Benefits Dental Care Program and Its Impacts on Nunavut's Inuit Population

It appears your Web browser is not configured to display PDF files. Download adobe Acrobat or click here to download the PDF file.

Click here to download the PDF file.

Creator: 

Moeller, Michael James

Date: 

2013

Abstract: 

Despite the fact that state-recognized Indigenous persons in Canada are eligible for dental care benefits through the federally-funded Non-Insured Health Benefits (NIHB) program, Nunavut’s Inuit suffer significant oral health disparities relative to the general Canadian population. This thesis explores how the administration of the NIHB program may contribute to the poor oral health outcomes for Nunavut’s Inuit. It proposes that the program as it exists today is financially unsustainable, and is not conducive to public health objectives, identifying three possible areas of reform: the fee-for-service remuneration model, which creates financial incentives for providers to over-treat patients and is not well-suited for Nunavut’s unique environment; the centralized administrative organization, which does not produce policies reflective of Inuit needs; and the provision of service days to communities, which does not follow any discernible formula. I conclude that increased devolution to an Inuit organization may offer solutions to each of these problems.

Subject: 

HEALTH AND ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES Health Sciences - Dentistry
HEALTH AND ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES Health Sciences - Health Care Management
SOCIAL SCIENCES Political Science - Public Administration

Language: 

English

Publisher: 

Carleton University

Thesis Degree Name: 

Master of Arts: 
M.A.

Thesis Degree Level: 

Master's

Thesis Degree Discipline: 

Public Administration

Parent Collection: 

Theses and Dissertations

Items in CURVE are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated. They are made available with permission from the author(s).