(K)not Building: Fabrics, Walls, Gender and Domestic Space in Nigeria

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Creator: 

Okungbowa, Lorraine

Date: 

2022

Abstract: 

This thesis explores the reconceptualization of domestic space through fabric. Walls in domestic spaces function as apparatuses of control, capturing, orienting, and influencing the behaviours of its inhabitants. In patriarchal societies, the partitioning of domestic space is used to perpetuate and reinforce patriarchal constructs via the gender assignment of space. This thesis is contextualized by my Nigerian heritage and is a reckoning with the legacy of Nigeria's British colonization. Nigeria's existing patriarchal nature intensified, and as a result, Nigerian women are still prescribed to the domestic realm. I explore the agency of making, walls, and fabric. The traditionally women-led production of fabrics in Nigerian societies prompts the proposal for textile walls as soft and permeable dividers that suggest more malleable gender divisions.

Subject: 

Architecture
Design and Decorative Arts
Women's Studies

Language: 

English

Publisher: 

Carleton University

Thesis Degree Name: 

Master of Architecture: 
M.Arch.

Thesis Degree Level: 

Master's

Thesis Degree Discipline: 

Architecture

Parent Collection: 

Theses and Dissertations

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