Negotiating Social Practices: The Role of Ubiquitous Computing In Students' Lives

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Creator: 

Todd, Benjamin

Date: 

2014

Abstract: 

This thesis explores how the digital divide goes beyond issues of access. In addition, I argue that the concept of a digital generation, or digital native is too simplistic. While young people are more dependent on ubiquitous computing devices such as cell phones, the way they are interpreting and using these technologies, even among users with the same access to ICTs, is different and varies from user to user. My research shows that while Carleton students see their use of mobile technology as increasingly and undeniably central to the way they communicate, form and express their social
identities and form collectivities, the way they are using these technologies and the meaning they assign them is fluid and changeable, forcing them to constantly negotiate with each other what kind of cell phone use is appropriate.

Subject: 

COMMUNICATIONS AND THE ARTS Mass Communications
SOCIAL SCIENCES Sociology - General
COMMUNICATIONS AND THE ARTS Speech Communication

Language: 

English

Publisher: 

Carleton University

Thesis Degree Name: 

Master of Arts: 
M.A.

Thesis Degree Level: 

Master's

Thesis Degree Discipline: 

Sociology

Parent Collection: 

Theses and Dissertations

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