Immanuel Kant's Response to David Hume's Regarding Cause and Effect

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Creator: 

Highstead, Thomas Steven

Date: 

2016

Abstract: 

When David Hume could not experience the impression of a necessary connection in the constant conjunction of two events, he reasoned that the necessity inherent in such a relation was the result of a feeling or desire; a determination of the mind to connect one event to another. Immanuel Kant, on the other hand, argued that the idea of cause was an innate structure of thought that provided the objective validity to a causal relationship. I argue that Kant’s combination of sensible intuition and the faculty of thought provides a more comprehensive and objective explanation of how we understand the necessary connection between a cause and its effect.

Subject: 

Philosophy

Language: 

English

Publisher: 

Carleton University

Thesis Degree Name: 

Master of Arts: 
M.A.

Thesis Degree Level: 

Master's

Thesis Degree Discipline: 

Philosophy

Parent Collection: 

Theses and Dissertations

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